Turning of the seasons

If you're living in the north east, it's probably no stretch or shame to say that you're exhausted with this winter. As mentioned in the last blog post when we explored shooting outside during inclement weather, we thought we were on the cusp of the finish line to the winter of '17. That wasn't necessarily the case, as we had one final nor'easter on the first full day of spring.

I'm personally looking forward to warmer temps, sunny skies, a drier climate and lush lawns. Clear roads, birds chirping... you get it. Along with photography, a love of mine is cycling... So I'm looking forward to the mornings and weekends when I can get out for a nice ride to clear my head while working up a sweat, get some skin color and come back home exhausted.

From an outdoor photography perspective, this will mean working with longer days and natural light in different ways than you might during the fall and winter. Utilizing the golden hour for natural light portrait work, getting warmer tones and bringing in the richer, fuller landscape as a background environment. It will mean adding different looks to the portfolio, as urban scenes will be supplemented with beach or forest settings... offering models and clients a fresh look to their photographs. This will also mean lighter wardrobes, different skin tones, perhaps lighter hair colors for those that tend to get darker in the winter.

Style-wise for pictures, it can mean employing lens flare to add a more dramatic touch. Using reflectors instead of off-camera lighting when possible. Overall, the spring and summer months offer up vast possibilities for capturing scenes... from portraits to sports to landscapes. Wilderness and beach scenes. And my favorite, more comfortable sessions where my hands aren't numb and I'm not putting a subject through mental and physical warfare with adverse conditions :)

But first, we have to wait until the thermometer makes its way above freezing so all this snow could melt....

Longing for these views

Longing for these views

This mess isn't getting in my way; Or, street photography in the snow

A favorite genre of mine is street photography. And while I haven't indulged in a good photo walk lately, I'm in the habit of bagging my camera for my commute most every day- exceptions usually being rainy or sloppy snow days. Today, at a moment's notice before heading out the door I decided I'd like to memorialize what hopefully turns out to be the last snow of the winter. So I put my smaller backpack down, packed up a true day pack to load up my work shoes and camera. Fingers crossed as I raise my ISO, lower my shutter speed and reduce my expectations on clear, crisp shots.

Stepping out of the belly of the beast at New York's Penn Station, you're treated to the rush of morning commuters eager to get to the safety and warmth of their cubby holes in the sky. Some walk, others cab it, others take the subway. This morning, everyone was feeling the effects.

The vibrancy of the city includes some ingredients that help validate her nickname, "The city that never sleeps".

While an inconvenience, it's still fun to observe the city at the dawning of a new day complete with the colors, sounds and action.

In the suburbs or the country, the falling snow can silence the landscape. There, you may only hear the soft sound of the flakes crunch as it falls. In the big town, the decibels may be reduced by the weather, but the noises never go away.

It was an enjoyable, brief walk as I made my way to the office. I've done this countless times in good weather and bad, so here's some points to think about if you're going to take on some street photography.... in good weather and bad:

  • Composition Have a purpose in street photography, and have some type of game plan as to how you're photographing a scene. Thinking of the photos above, are you planning on capturing the weather- the snow falling? Or is today's snow just the background of your story. Think about the emphasis of your image, and plan your composition around that as the centerpiece. Adding in the details can be as simple as zooming in and out with your feet, or using other environmental components to help contribute to a more interesting story.
  • Scene Incorporating the composition, as well as location, will give you your scene. You can think about shooting from inside of a building's lobby looking out to provide an element of shelter, comfort or to draw a picture of space- both indoors and out- to convey contrasting environments.
  • Mood Are you looking for an environmental story, the human element or possibly capturing a definitive moment? As with the pedestrians crossing 7th Avenue above, we're intimately observing people rushing through cold weather while they're being mindful of the dangers of traffic. This can be quite different than a relaxed photo of an elderly lady enjoying a Cappuccino on a mid-summer weekend morning.
  • Shoot in manual mode This is more of a technical point, but I can't stress enough the fundamentals of learning to master your gear on the move. You create art "in camera" by learning to manipulate the exposure to your liking. Do you want to capture a dramatic silhouette? How are you metering? What are you exposing for? Is your intention to freeze time, or to show a leave blowing along the ground with a slight blur? How are you adjusting your depth of field to account for the crowd walking toward you- are you going to emphasize the person mid-shot lighting a cigarette, or the young lady closest to the camera walking under her umbrella?

Anyhow, street photography. It's helped me consider my portrait work, environmentally and posed. It will help me tackle a few upcoming projects where capturing outdoor scenes will be rooted in the street genre. Plan a few hours of your own- it can be Main Street, U.S.A, or your nearest city. Or drop me a note, I'd love to get together for a session. 

Further evolution

As you take on more work and projects, you'll evolve and learn as a side benefit. Your networking will lead to inquiries, requests and beneficial conversations that are golden opportunities to get invaluable exposure. Taking on work that sits outside of your norm is fine; as at the end of the day Photography is Photography. It's always a positive experience to deliver a finished product when your customer is happy and you're proud of the end result. Bottom line, you can always take on projects to help build relationships, establish a presence and become a trusted resource and partner.

Take on personal projects when you're testing techniques, working on lighting, or filling in gaps of your portfolio. Recruit those closest to you - it's a way to connect, laugh and have some fun. A huge benefit is that you can document your growth as well as theirs (especially in the case of kids). I like to think of these opportunities as a chance for free marketing and expanding your word-of-mouth network.

The last month has been busy in winding down from New York Fashion Week, curating, sneaking in some outdoor portrait work in between the raindrops, addressing storage needs and something more tangible to you - re-branding this site. Thanks for your patience and thanks for stopping by. As with the hints above, we'll be seeing some business marketing work in the very near future, as local and urban networking will bear its fruit. Stay tuned!

Taking on the tasks

As I start to ramp up my schedule in arranging shoots, networking, contacting models and even landing a pair of credentials for New York Fashion Week, the need for planning is key in executing the game plan while building a process for the behind-the-scenes aspect of photography. As you would learn, the hardest part of getting yourself off the ground isn't the time spent behind the camera. It's when you're acting as your own business manager, secretary and communications coordinator. It goes far beyond camera bodies, lenses and memory cards!

The first step in filling the calendar with shoots and meetups, as well as other photography-related events, takes just that- a proper desk pad calendar. Sure, the calendar app on your phone, Google or other online calendars are essential as you're constantly on the go and need to sync your master schedule. But at the end of the day, it pays to go analog and pick up a desktop calendar to help flesh out your appointments. And don't forget to include your personal obligations, or you'll need to bump, move or worse cancel important engagements. The visual aid (photography, remember?), as well as the repetitive nature of physically jotting down your shoots and meetings feel a little more tangible and gratifying than solely keeping everything in cyberspace or on a phone dependent on a charge. This *major* addition to my arsenal ran me less than an iPhone Lightning Cable!

Now... onto what's on tap! The main highlights take place mid-month, as we're looking at a pair of events that will be a first for me, during New York Fashion Week. The first show, ASC Fashion Week takes place February 10th. The following Friday, I've been granted all-access to the New York Fashion Gala for Exalt Fashion on February 16th.

That said, there's a few model shoots thrown in for good measure- so be sure to check back here, Facebook and Instagram as always. And for some street photography, you can also see my personal IG project page as that is a passion of mine.

Get organized!

Get organized!